Parkinson’s Foundation Moving Day!

We are honored to be a sponsor of the Parkinson’s Foundation’s Annual Moving Day. Come join Team Broad Street at Soldier Field’s south tailgating lot Sunday, October 6 at 9:00 am.

Moving Day is your chance to speak up about Parkinson’s Disease and move others to take action. It is a movement for change—towards more awareness, more funding, and more understanding of a disease that affects so many of our family and friends. Sign up to participate in the walk or donate directly to the event.

See the Chicago Moving Day website for details and more information! 

For more information about Broad Street’s Comprehensive Parkinson’s Program please visit our Comprehensive Parkinson’s page or call us at 847.728.0134.

Bill Bucklew and Broad Street at Belmont Village in Glenview, September 18th!

Looking for Inspiration? Come see Bill Bucklew and Broad Street’s Diane Breslow and Brian Lebens as Bill discusses his personal journey through Parkinson’s. This is part of the Parkinson’s Educational series at Belmont Village Senior Living in Glenview, IL.

Since being diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease in 2012, Bill has been dedicated to bettering the lives of those with the disease. In 2017, Bill began a journey to walk 2,500 miles from coast to coast in 67 days. He sits on the board of the Michael J. Fox Foundation and is the founder of UnCorked Adventures, an organization with the mission of helping people with Parkinson’s make the most out of life.

This presentation is September 18th from 5-7pm and will include dinner. Please RSVP to jpaterno@belmontvillage.com.

Social workers and registered nurses will receive 1 CEU at the completion of this program. CEUs provided by Silver Connections.

Broad Street provides Care Professionals who can assist with the activities of daily living, help manage medication, doctor visits and overall health care and awareness. Our Comprehensive Parkinson’s Program is especially designed or those with Parkinson’s. Through our Professional Network, we can help you find the right resources like advocates and care managers. We provide home care in Wilmette, Illinois, the North Shore area of Chicago. For more information, please call 847.728.0134.

Lake Shore Shuffle for Parkinson’s

Broad Street Home Care is proud to sponsor the Lake Shore Shuffle for Parkinson’s, led by Bill Bucklew and Uncorked Adventures. We are aligned in the mission of helping people with Parkinson’s Disease to make the most out of life. Our specific role is Home Care in supporting our clients to live their life to the fullest.

Please join us September 8th at 9 am at the Lakefront Campus @ Northwestern University in Evanston, IL.

Broad Street provides Care Professionals who can assist with the activities of daily living, help manage medication, doctor visits and overall health care and awareness. Through our Professional Network, we can help you find the right resources like advocates and care managers. We provide home care in Wilmette, Illinois, the North Shore area of Chicago. For more information, please call 847.728.0134.

Diane Breslow joins Broad Street as Clinical Consultant

Broad Street Home Care is pleased to announce that Diane Breslow, MSW, LCSW recently joined Broad Street as Clinical Consultant and Curriculum Developer working in support of Broad Street’s Comprehensive Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders Program.  Ms. Breslow will focus on the development of Broad Street’s internal and external efforts in Parkinson’s education and awareness, as well as their collaborative approach to effective Parkinson’s care.

Ms. Breslow, MSW, LCSW (Illinois Licensed Clinical Social Worker) has worked as an educator, support group leader, consultant, program development specialist, and clinician counseling individuals and families. She has taught psychology and social work courses at many Chicago colleges and universities. Diane received her BA with Honors in Psychology from the University of Missouri in Columbia. She holds a Master’s Degree in Social Work, with a specialty in Family Therapy, from the University Of Maryland School Of Social Work.

Ms. Breslow is “thrilled to work with the committed team at Broad Street Home Care.” She states that “Through staff training, professional and community seminars, and client consultation, I will have the opportunity to reach and impact many individuals and families who are affected by movement disorders.”

“Diane possesses a wealth of knowledge and experience, not only in the direct support of individuals with PD and their families but also in the interdisciplinary coordination of health systems working together to provide a seamless care path,” Sam Cross, Administrator of Broad Street, said in a statement. 

“We are very fortunate to have her join our team, to help guide us to the next level of comprehensive, symptom-specific support for our clients,” Cross added.

With a long-standing knowledge of movement disorders as well as an expertise in systems theory, Ms. Breslow has collaborated with numerous Chicagoland retirement homes, assisted living facilities, and nursing homes in establishing movement disorders programming and holistic care. In 2003 she was honored to be chosen as the first Center Coordinator of Northwestern Medicine’s Parkinson’s disease and Movement Disorders Center, a Parkinson Foundation (PF) Center of Excellence, under the medical directorship of Tanya Simuni, MD. During her 12-year tenure there, Diane developed the Center’s program components and counseled patients and families.

Broad Street provides Care Professionals who can assist with the activities of daily living, help manage medication, doctor visits and overall health care and awareness. Through our Professional Network, we can help you find the right resources like advocates and care managers. We provide home care in Wilmette, Illinois, the North Shore area of Chicago. For more information, please call 847.728.0134.

Top 10 Parkinson’s Disease Articles from 2018

Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease each year. The combined direct and indirect cost of Parkinson’s, including treatment, social security payments and lost income, is estimated to be nearly $25 billion per year in the United States alone.

Medications alone cost an average of $2,500 a year.

Because there is no cure, at present, for Parkinson’s Disease, the most common treatment is directed at managing or improving symptoms. That being the case there are more than enough studies being conducted and theories being tested on best methods and new modalities for the science and medicine behind the disease.

If you’re interested in the top articles in the on-going dialogue that is Parkinson’s Disease, Parkinson’s News Today has a great list of top reads from 2018.

The list includes clinical phase trials, possible vaccines, research, and related symptoms.

Need help with Parkinson’s Disease? Broad Street Home Care’s Comprehensive Parkinson’s Program ensures best practices thanks to our partnership with Struther’s Parkinson’s Care Network. We provide Personal Assistants who are specially trained in the condition and who can help manage medication, doctor visits and overall health care and awareness. Through our Professional Network we can help you find the right resources like advocates to attend appointments with you and doctors to help answer questions or identify areas of concern. We provide home care in Wilmette, Illinois, the North Shore area of Chicago. For more information, please call 847.728.0134.

 

The Topic of Aging Comes to Market

How we define aging helps us age better (as well as have compassion for others who are aging).

Compared to previous generations health care and medicine are better at elongating our lives. We have better education and awareness about preventative care including regular exercise and diet. We’re working longer at our careers and we engage in more vibrant lifestyle choices. Business is noticing this, and with a rate of approximately 10,000 Baby Boomers turning 65 each day, marketers are perking up their ears too.

Not that any of us need a reason to have marketers target us any more closely than they already do, however, we have to remember that in the digital age marketing is blended into the content that drives awareness. So, if we want the right message to inform the topic of aging we first need to drop the outdated ideas.

On one hand we don’t want to over-infantilize the aged by promoting 99-year-olds who have tattoos, wear tight clothing, high heels/biker boots and hang out at bars with Instagram celebrities. On the other hand, the concept of aging doesn’t need to suggest a future specter of declining health and diminished lifestyle.

What is aging? Is the term anti-aging an appropriate word to describe the resistance of it? The magazine Allure has announced that it will no longer use the term anti-aging. To support it, celebrities offered some really beautiful quotes about their own experience with the aging process.

Aging doesn’t need to be an activity we resist, rather, it‘s a situation we need to embrace and support. It is change based on the passage of time and according to many, opens up a welcome, deeper sense of experience.

While it’s true that aging brings a new set of physical conditions to the body and mind, as Isabella Rossalini says in an InStyle article;

“At 66, my approach to aging is… To embrace it. I never feel like, “Oh, I wish I were 35.” When you’re young, you have the pressure to earn money, prove yourself. I had to be a beauty, an actress, and do the red carpet. The fact that I was interested in animals or running a farm had no value. So, age has given me time to do all the things I’ve always wanted to do. I feel richer in a way. OK, the neck I don’t love! And I’ve certainly lost agility. I can’t do somersaults anymore, but it’s all right.

It’s also true that many agers report feeling better about themselves in advanced age than they did when they were younger; the pressure is off and more wisdom is gained.

A 20-year longitudinal study found that negative mood and depressive symptoms decreased significantly as women transition from mid-life (ages 50 to 64) to later life (65 and older). For many women, this appears to be related to the positivity around more “me” time as they wind down from full-time work and family responsibilities.

Being happy while you age is referred to as the aging paradox – the idea that while certain things decline, happiness increases. It seems the face of aging has many sides.

So the question is; do we need commerce to validate and steer the aging process by commoditizing it? Or is the societal idea of aging in general getting a much-needed face-lift thanks to social media and marketing?

The bottom line is that it should be like the golden rule; treat others the way you wish to be treated.

Let’s respect the aging process. It’s coming for us all. And while there are many things that set individuals apart, the one thing we can all count on is that we all age and that we may not always like the way it plays out. However, if we have the right mindset, the right dialogue around it and the right support, aging can be a very enlivened experience.

 

Healthy Eating and Alzheimer’s Disease

Eating healthy foods helps everyone stay well. It’s even more important for people with Alzheimer’s disease. Here are some tips for healthy eating.

Buying and Preparing Food

When the person with Alzheimer’s disease lives with you:

-Buy healthy foods such as vegetables, fruits, and whole-grain products. -Be sure to buy foods that the person likes and can eat.
-Give the person choices about what to eat—for example, “Would you like green beans or salad?”
-Buy food that is easy to prepare, such as pre-made salads and single food portions.

When a person with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease lives alone, you can buy foods that the person doesn’t need to cook. Call to remind him or her to eat.

Maintain Familiar Routines

Change can be difficult for a person with Alzheimer’s disease. Maintaining familiar routines and serving favorite foods can make mealtimes easier. They can help the person know what to expect and feel more relaxed. If a home health aide or other professional provides care, family members should tell this caregiver about the person’s preferences.

Try these tips:

-View mealtimes as opportunities for social interaction. A warm and happy tone of voice can set the mood.
-Respect personal, cultural, and religious food preferences, such as eating tortillas instead of bread or avoiding pork.
-If the person has always eaten meals at specific times, continue to serve meals at those times.
-Serve meals in a consistent, familiar place and way whenever possible.
-Avoid new routines, such as serving breakfast to a person who has never routinely eaten breakfast.

As Alzheimer’s progresses, familiar routines and food choices may need to be adapted to meet the person’s changing needs. For example, a family custom of serving appetizers before dinner can be preserved, but higher-calorie items might be offered to help maintain the person’s weight.

Stay Safe

In the early stage of Alzheimer’s, people’s eating habits usually do not change. When changes do occur, living alone may not be safe anymore. Look for these signs to see if living alone is no longer safe for the person with Alzheimer’s:

-The person forgets to eat.
-Food was burned because it was left on the stove.
-The oven isn’t turned off.

Other difficulties, such as not sitting down long enough for meals and refusing to eat, can arise in the middle and late stages of the disease. These changes can lead to poor nourishment, dehydration, abnormally low blood pressure, and other problems.

Caregivers should monitor the person’s weight and eating habits to make sure he or she is not eating too little or too much. Other things to look for include appetite changes, the person’s level of physical activity, and problems with chewing or swallowing. Talk with the person’s doctor about changes in eating habits.

Reprinted from The National Institute on Aging

Broad Street can help. We provide Personal Assistants who can assist with the activities of daily living, help manage medication, doctor visits and overall health care and awareness. Through our Professional Network we can help you find the right resources like advocates and care managers. We provide home care in Wilmette, Illinois, the North Shore area of Chicago. For more information, please call 847.728.0134.

Chronic Conditions and Aging at Home

Chronic diseases can have a profound impact on the health and quality of life of elder Americans, not to mention the financial burden that is often associated with long-term illness. But specialists in gerontology and the emerging field of anti-aging medicine are quick to point out that while the risk of disease and disability undoubtedly can increase with advancing years, poor health is not an inevitable consequence of aging.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) a lot of the sickness, disability, and even death associated with chronic disease can be avoided through preventive measures. The CDC suggests lessening the possibility of the onset of chronic disease in later years by:

• Practicing a healthy lifestyle that includes healthy eating, regular exercise and avoiding tobacco use.
• Regular use of early detection and testing such as breast, prostate and cervical cancer screenings, diabetes and cholesterol screenings, bone density scans, etc.

Most common chronic conditions of the elderly

All too often, because there are so many chronic conditions that seem to afflict older persons, there is the mistaken perception that diabetes, arthritis and the like, are just “part of growing old” — and nothing can be done about them. The truth is most of these diseases and conditions are treatable and should be addressed by a physician. According to the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists, the most common chronic diseases afflicting the elderly are:

• Adult-onset diabetes
• Arthritis
• Kidney and bladder problems
• Dementia
• Parkinson’s disease
• Glaucoma
• Lung disease
• Cataracts
• Osteoporosis
• Enlarged prostate
• Alzheimer’s disease
• Macular degeneration
• Depression
• Cardiovascular disease

If your parents are diagnosed with any of these or other illnesses, the best thing you can do is to educate yourself about how you can best help them. Usually, when an older person is diagnosed with a chronic condition, there is an immediate feeling of facing a loss of freedom and autonomy, a sense that his or her days of living independently at home are numbered. This fear may actually make your aging parents refuse to seek help. Experts agree that one of the most practical ways an adult child can help parents facing a chronic illness is by providing information about available resources to enhance their independence and quality of life. All the major chronic conditions listed in this article have an associated foundation or association with information that can help your parent to live with his or her condition. Providing these resources is one of the most important gifts you can give to your aging parent.

“A lot of the sickness, disability and even death associated with chronic disease can be avoided through preventive measures.” — Centers for Disease Control

There are also many companies that are dedicated to manufacturing and distributing products specifically made to help people “age at home” including:

-Reachers — lobster claw-like devices for people with arthritis or other muscle or joint conditions that make bending or reaching difficult.
-Shower chairs and bath benches and hand-held shower heads for bathing.
-Elevated toilet seats.
-Automatic lifts for stairwells, beds, and chairs.
-Talking clocks, wristwatches, and calculators for people with poor vision.

Helping a parent with a chronic condition maintain his or her lifestyle can be a challenge, but by providing information about resources and other help available you can take comfort in the knowledge that you are doing what you can to support your parent’s needs and wishes.

Reprinted from Parentgiving.com.

Broad Street can help. We provide Personal Assistants who can assist with the activities of daily living, help manage medication, doctor visits and overall health care and awareness. Through our Professional Network, we can help you find the right resources like advocates and care managers. We provide home care in Wilmette, Illinois, the North Shore area of Chicago. For more information, please call 847.728.0134.

 

Specialized Home Care

Specialized home care can make the difference between someone watching your loved one to someone actively supporting unique health needs. Broad Street’s high level of customized service along with Nurse Oversight makes us uniquely effective when it comes to supporting individuals with underlying health conditions. This includes understanding your specific needs and providing detailed training to your carefully chosen assistants. Your care is proactively managed to provide you with the best solution.

Parkinson’s Disease

Although the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease can be complex and ever-changing, we focus on you and your individual goals and objectives. Through our Comprehensive Parkinson’s Program, we provide trained professionals to work with you and address the specific symptoms affecting your life, both visible and under the surface. Our goal is to not only ensure your safety and support but to empower you to continue to live your life.

Alzheimer’s Disease

Working with Alzheimer’s and other forms of Dementia requires a deep sense of empathy and understanding. At Broad Street, we focus on treating you with the respect and dignity you deserve. By getting to know you and your history, we establish a routine that encourages mental and physical activity. To accomplish this, we provide the right personal assistant who has the experience and training but equally as important, is able to relate with you or your loved one on a personal level. Ultimately our goal is to promote happiness for you and comfort for your family.

Stroke Recovery

The abruptness of Stroke can be traumatizing not only physically but emotionally as well. The change
in your daily routine and the time it takes to recover can be frustrating for you and your family. Broad Street works to ease this process by developing a comprehensive plan which includes simplifying your daily function and helping you stay engaged and progressing towards physical and mental recovery. With Nurse Oversight, we assist you in following your physician’s plan of care, which may include medication management, blood work or the maintenance of a proper diet. Our goal is to minimize your frustration and accelerate your path towards recovery.

Chronic Conditions including Diabetes, COPD and CHF

As our population ages, we become more susceptible to developing one or more of these chronic conditions. The impact these conditions have on you or your loved ones depends on how well they are managed. With Broad Street’s nurse oversight working collaboratively with our experienced personal assistants, we help you manage your condition. This is often achieved through a regimen of improved diet and exercise as well as medication management. Your care is also proactively managed by our nurses who can consult with your physician and provide clinical feedback. The goal is to keep you healthy and at home, and to minimize the need for future hospitalizations.

Other Cognitive and Physical Conditions

Broad Street maintains a well-developed professional network of clinical specialists and ancillary support services. These relationships, combined with a customized service plan and client specific training, are instrumental in providing personalized support for a range of cognitive and/or physical conditions.

This can include the following:
– Cancer treatment and recovery
– Neuromotor diseases including MS and ALS
– Traumatic brain injury
– Depression and other emotional issues
– Advanced mobility assistance and fall prevention

Broad Street can help. We provide Personal Assistants who can assist with the activities of daily living, help manage medication, doctor visits and overall health care and awareness. Through our Professional Network we can help you find the right resources like advocates and care managers. We provide home care in Wilmette, Illinois, the North Shore area of Chicago. For more information, please call 847.728.0134.